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The Woman Who Can’t be Stopped; Rico Nasty

Rico nasty
Photo By: Kaite McCurdy 2018

By Lauren Robinson A.K.A Nobody’s Millennium

Before becoming a rapper named Rico Nasty she was first an only born child in Largo, Maryland, named Maria Kelly. Largo is described by the rapper as “[having] nice homes and black-owned businesses, but it gets rough real fast,” she says. At age 11, she and her mom moved to the Palmer Park area which was a tougher scenery. Rico did not adjust well to her new surroundings. Her grades began to slip so her mother sent her to a Baltimore boarding school for high-achieving disenfranchised students. From a young age, Rico had a different mindset than her peers, and didn’t try to conform with middle school cliques. In an interview with Fader, Rico says, “I was like, weird on purpose. I wanted to be an outcast,” she said.

Musically she began listening to nu metal bands like Slipknot at the age of 13. But that same year her parents got a divorce and by age 15 she describes herself as “really [getting] into the trap,” and also “dealing with hood niggas, skipping school, and selling weed.” Throughout all of that she still continued to rap in high school, and dropped her first project Summers Eve her junior year. Her music career slowed down at the age of 18 when she gave birth to her son.

A lot of people told her to settle down but Rico believed that rap was a way to change people’s lives in a positive way. She took a small break from making music, and teamed up with her manager/ current boyfriend to release the viral single, “iCarly” in 2016. Then the song “Hey Arnold” was released a few months later. After years of releasing music, she was able to connect with an audience of mostly young women.

Rico has two projects out that were released in 2017 titled Sugar Trap 2, and Tales of Tacobella. Big news in regards to Rico’s career; she signed a deal with Atlantic Records June 7th, 2018.

Rico’s music can be described as angry and raunchy. This sound is needed in a world where black women are silenced constantly in many social realms where Rico prospers (YouTube, Instagram, etc.) Also she’s a representation of the growth and metamorphosis the genre of Hip Hop is going through by holding artists more accountable for their lyrics and actually having a real message.

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